Category Archives: Research

History of Native American Heritage Month

In 1915, the annual Congress of the American Indian Association formally approved a plan concerning American Indian Day. It directed its president, Rev. Sherman Coolidge to call upon the country to observe such a day. Coolidge issued a proclamation on Sept. 28, 1915, which declared the second Saturday of each May as an American Indian Day and contained the first formal appeal for recognition of Indians as citizens.

The year before this proclamation was issued, Red Fox James rode horseback from state to state seeking approval for a day to honor Indians. On December 14, 1915, he presented the endorsements of 24 state governments at the White House. There is no record, however, of such a national day being proclaimed.

The first American Indian Day in a state was declared in May 1916 by the governor of New York. Several states celebrate the fourth Friday in September.

In 1990 President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution designating November 1990 as “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Similar proclamations, under variants names (including “Native American Heritage Month” and “National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month”) have been issued each year since 1994.

Source:

“About National Native American Heritage Month.” Library of Congress. https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/about/.  (accessed on November 16, 2017).

 

A Brief History of Halloween

While the origins of Halloween are not entirely clear, is definitely intertwined with religious practices and celebrations of the past. Wiccan and Pagan groups are amongst largest groups who celebrate the holiday, while some Christian groups fear that demonic activity increases around this time of the year. A pre-Christian Celtic holiday called Samhain is thought by many to be the precursor to the holiday, Halloween, we celebrate today. It is difficult to completely trace its origins, as it was Christianized in the fourth or fifth century; we are unsure today what traditions and ideologies were added on because of this. Samhain was a day of heightened spiritual activity, and they believed that fairies, spirits, and souls of the dead could pass through their world to ours much easier that day. To protect themselves from these spirits and possible demons, the Celts would build massive bonfires, they would burn crops, and they wore costumes to ward off the spirits.

giphy[2]However, the Halloween we know today is a concoction of several different, borrowed traditions; many rituals of Halloween we see today are derived from times later than that of Samhain. In the 600s, Pope Boniface IV named November 1st All Saints’ Day to honor saints and martyrs. Some believe that picking that day was deliberately meant; they wanted to Christianize Samhain, which happened just the day before. Despite this coincidence, it is not clear if this was the intention. On All Saints’ Day, people would dress up, possibly to ward off spirits they thought were coming back from the dead. At this time, people in England went around and practiced “souling”, a practice in which they would ask for food and in return would give them a prayer for the dead. This is a possible precursor for trick-or-treating, especially because as time progressed, people would give out the soulers sweet “soul cakes”, mimicking the candy we get today. These are only possible origins for Halloween, as its true ones are not entirely certain or uncovered yet.

Works Cited:

Giphy. “Vintage Halloween.” https://giphy.com/gifs/vintage-halloween-z8UZbZzCPig2A. (accessed October 30, 2017).

Henry, Andrew. “History of Halloween.” ReligionForBreakfast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVB5rPfWPtc (accessed October 30, 2017).

Jabaji, Rawan. “Halloween.” Public Broadcasting System. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/five-things/halloween/4594/ (accessed October 30, 2017).

October Dispatches: Isn’t It a Pity? The Real Problem with Special Needs

In recognition of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, the Cardinal Cushing Library and Learning Commons will be releasing a series of TedTalks. These discussions, released throughout the month via Cardinal Cushing Library and Learning Commons Social Media, will be personal narratives that discuss the views of individuals with disabilities and the people affected individuals with disabilities (e.g. parents and siblings) in contemporary society.

Topics will include: social views of disability, peer-to-peer relationships, parental and sibling experiences with disabilities. Other topics will include: employment, higher education and dating. #EmmanuelOSAMP #InclusionWorks

Today’s talk comes from Torrie Dunlap who discusses the various prisms that society views people with disabilities:

 

Tip of the Week: How to Cite Sources

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When conducting research and writing a research paper it is always important to make it clear to your reader exactly where you got your information. There are many citation styles available to do this quickly and easily, including APA Style, MLA Style, Chicago/Turabian Style, ACS Style, and more. In most cases your professor will require the use of a specific style of citation.

For more information on citation styles and how to use them, consult the library’s Writing Resources Research Guide: http://library.emmanuel.edu/sp2/subjects/guide.php?subject=writing_resources

Also, now available to Emmanuel College library patrons is RefWorks, an electronic citation management tool.

To Set up a RefWorks Account:

  1. Register  from a computer on campus by going to http://www.refworks.com/refworks and following the directions.
  2. Once you are registered, you will receive an email confirming your registration and providing instructions for accessing your RefWorks account off campus.

Instructions for Using RefWorks:

See http://refworks.libguides.com/home

Featured Database: Academic Search Premier

Academic Search Premier is a Multidisciplinary database that provides access to summaries and citations for articles in 8,450 publications, with full-text access for more than 4,600 of those titles, and searchable cited references for more than 1,000 publications. Since this database covers all subjects, it often makes sense to start off here when beginning a research assignment regardless of your field of study.

– Explore this database for extensive full-text coverage in biology, chemistry, engineering, physics, psychology, religion, theology and other disciplines in the humanities.

– This database offers the option to limit to “Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals.” Of the full- text articles available in Academic Search Premier, more than 3,900 are peer reviewed articles.

– Access Academic Search Premier by using the Quick Links to Library Resources drop-down menu or the A-Z List of Databases link on the Library Homepage under the Library Resources heading.

Use the Research/Course Guides link on the Library Homepage to explore article databases by specific subjects.

– Posted by the Reference Department

Tip of the week: Interlibrary loan

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Interlibrary Loan allows current students, faculty, and staff of Emmanuel College access to books and articles outside the Cardinal Cushing Library collection.

Keep in mind that in addition to requesting materials, you may also visit Fenway Libraries Online (FLO) and Fenway Library Consortium (FLC) institutions in person for immediate access. Always check the individual library’s web site for hours and access information.

Access the Interlibrary Loan form and policy on the Library home page under “Library Services and Policies” in the left column.

Questions about interlibrary loan? Stop by the reference desk or email us at reference@emmanuel.edu.

Featured Database: Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts

Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA) provides access to summaries of articles in more than 600 academic journals, as well as books and research reports. Content focuses on librarianship, classification, cataloging, online information retrieval, information management, digital technology, and more.

– Explore this database when researching topics in Information Technology, Education, and Sociology.

– This database offers the option to limit to “Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals.”

– Access the Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts database by using the Quick Links to Library Resources drop-down menu or the A-Z List of Databases link on the Library Homepage under the Library Resources heading.

Use the Research Guides link on the Library Homepage to explore article databases by specific subjects.

– Posted by the Reference Department

Featured Database: Educator’s Reference Complete

Educator’s Reference Complete provides access to more than 1,110 academic journals, 200 reports, and more, including videos and images. Content focuses on educational principles, child development and psychology, and best practices in education. The majority of the titles included are also found in the ERIC database. Educator’s Reference Complete is updated daily.

Other subjects covered include: bilingual education, health education, testing, and technology.

Access the Educator’s Reference Complete Database by using the Quick Links to Library Resources drop-down menu or the A-Z List of Databases link on the Library Homepage  under the Library Resources heading.

This database offers the option to limit to “peer-reviewed publications.”

Use the Research Guides link on the Library Homepage to explore article databases by specific subjects including other Education specific databases.

– Posted by the Reference Department

Featured Database: Art Full Text

– The Art Full Text database provides full-text access to many journal articles on art and art history. For articles where only a citation or abstract is provided, click on the Check for Full Text icon to determine availability.

– Other subjects covered in this database include women’s studies, cultural studies, and history.

– Access the Art Full Text database by using the Quick Links to Library Resources drop-down menu or the A-Z List of Databases link on the Library Homepage.

– To search only Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals, select this option from the limiters.

Use the Research Guides link on the Library Homepage to explore other subject-specific databases in Art/Art History.

Posted by the Reference Department

Featured Database: PsycINFO

    • A major source for citations of scholarly articles in the field of psychology, as well as other areas including nursing and medical, law, social work, neuroscience, business, forensics, and more!
    • Full text of many of these articles may be accessed through the other databases by clicking on the Check for Full Text link found with the article citations.
    • To limit to only peer-reviewed articles, select Peer Reviewed from the limiter options.
    • To access PsycINFO, use the Quick Links to Library Resources drop-down menu or the A to Z List of Databases link on the Library Homepage [http://library.emmanuel.edu/].
    • Use the Research Guides link on the Library home page to explore other helpful article databases by specific subjects.

Posted by the Reference Department